The Board

The UK Committee of the Blue Shield consists of a Chair, a Secretariat, a Webmaster, and members drawn from universities, charities, and heritage protection organisations across the UK.  The Committee also has advisors from the military, the British Red Cross and UNESCO, all of whom have the status of Observers on the Committee.

 

Chair: Professor Peter Stone, OBE

Professor Peter StonePeter is a Professor of Heritage Studies and the 2016 UNESCO Chair in Cultural Property Protection and Peace. He stepped into this role from his former role as Head of School of Arts and Cultures for the International Centre of Culture and Heritage Studies Department at Newcastle University, England. In additional to his role as Chair of the UK Committee, he is Secretary General of the Association of National Committees of the Blue Shield, and a member of the UK National Commission for UNESCO’s Expert Network. He has published widely on heritage management, interpretation and education. Peter has worked extensively overseas and advised UNESCO’s World Heritage Centre on the original development of the World Heritage Education Programme. In 2003 Peter was the advisor to the Ministry of Defence with regard to the identification and protection of the archaeological cultural heritage in Iraq. He gave evidence to the Parliamentary Select Committee regarding the Draft Cultural Heritage (Armed conflicts) Bill, that was intended to enable the UK to ratify the 1954 Hague Convention on the Protection of the Cultural Heritage in Times of Armed Conflict and its two Protocols of 1954 and 1999. He continues to be heavily involved in lobbying the UK Government to ratify the Convention and its Protocols. Peter co-edited, with Joanne Farchakh Bajjaly, The Destruction of Cultural Heritage in Iraq (2008). In 2011 this was awarded the prestigious James R Wiseman book award by the Archaeological Institute of America. In 2008 he worked with staff of the Oriental Institute in Chicago to produce a travelling version of their exhibition ‘Catastrophe! The Destruction of Cultural Heritage in Iraq‘. Peter’s current research interests include the development of holistic approaches to the management of large heritage sites, the role of world heritage in UNESCO, and the protection of cultural property in the event of armed conflict.

http://www.ncl.ac.uk/sacs/staff/profile/peter.stone/

 

Secretary: Dr Paul Fox

Paul FoxPaul is a historian of war and its representation in Western visual culture. He received his doctorate at University College London and is currently employed as a research fellow on the University of York’s project, British Military Encounters with Egypt, 1798—1918. Paul also teaches at University College London. His classes on the representation of armed conflict address issues including the construction of national and gendered identities, witnessing and testimony, protest, commemoration, as well as restitution and the in situ conservation of objects endangered by conflict. Paul is also a visiting lecturer at Cranfield University at the Defence Academy. He lectures on the memory of conflict and the cultural construction of martial identities in Britain and South Asia, and is the co-author of a programme preparing cultural specialists for operational deployments. Paul was formerly a military intelligence officer. He has extensive experience delivering intelligence support to operational activities of all types. Paul stepped up to be our new Secretary in 2016.

 

Secretariat: Philip Deans

Philip is a postgraduate research student at Newcastle University’s Media, Culture, Heritage department in the School of Arts and Cultures. He has a varied background which continues to inform his work. As a researcher, Philip is interested in how museum histories, and how national histories and historical artefacts are curated, during armed conflict. Moreover, he is interested in what national history museum exhibitions, defined broadly, reveal about a society’s social, political and economic mind-set at time of display, and the many environments from which those mind-sets are derived.

Philip also sits on the board of the Museums and Galleries History Group as Postgraduate Officer. He can be found on Twitter and Academia.edu.

 

Webmaster: Dr Emma Cunliffe

Emma CunliffeEmma is a member of the Endangered Archaeology in the Middle East and North Africa Project, based at Oxford University, where she uses satellite imagery to study damage to archaeological sites in peace and conflict across the Middle East The team are investigating the key threats to heritage in the region, working with national and international heritage agencies to develop strategies to protect the valuable archaeology of this amazing area. She can be found on Linked In and Academia.edu.

 

Members:

Robert Bevan

Robert BevanRobert is a journalist and heritage consultant with qualifications in architecture, town planning and urban design. He has been interested in the fate of heritage in conflict for some decades now following visits to Bosnia and the West Bank. In 2006, he wrote a book ‘The Destruction of Memory’: it was the first to comprehensively address the issue of targeted heritage. A documentary has been made of the book, released summer 2016. He is now writing a follow up and pursuing the connections between heritage and genocide early warning systems. As a journalist, he is the architecture critic for the Evening Standard. As a heritage consultant, he has worked recently on various public realm projects in London and a strategy to regenerate post-Olympic east London that protects creative uses. He is a member of ICOMOS’s ICORP committees, and its cultural tourism committee.

 

Dr Neil Brodie

Neil BrodieNeil Brodie graduated from the University of Liverpool with a PhD Archaeology in 1991 and has held positions at the British School at Athens, the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge, where he was Research Director of the Illicit Antiquities Research Centre, and Stanford University’s Archaeology Center. Since February 2012 he has been Senior Research Fellow at the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research, at the University of Glasgow, where he is researching the criminology and economics of the antiquities market as part of the ERC-funded Trafficking Culture project. He has published widely on issues concerning the antiquities market, and was co-author (with Jennifer Doole and Peter Watson) of the report Stealing History commissioned by the Museums Association and ICOM-UK to advise upon the illicit trade in cultural material. He also co-edited Archaeology, Cultural Heritage, and the Antiquities Trade (2006, with Morag M. Kersel, Christina Luke and Kathryn Walker Tubb), Illicit Antiquities: The Theft of Culture and the Extinction of Archaeology (2002, with Kathryn Walker Tubb), and Trade in Illicit Antiquities: The Destruction of the World’s Archaeological Heritage (2001, with Jennifer Doole and Colin Renfrew). He has worked on archaeological projects in the United Kingdom, Greece and Jordan, and continues to work in Greece

 

Martin Brown

Principal Archaeologist, WYG Environmental Planning Transport Ltd

 

Hugo Clarke

Hugo ClarkHugo Clarke was commissioned into the Scots Guards in 1990, seeing service in Germany, the First Gulf War and Northern Ireland, where he was awarded the Queen’s Commendation for Bravery. Leaving the army in 1995 he joined the HALO Trust, a mine clearance charity, training and leading indigenous teams in Afghanistan and Angola. He now sits as a Member of the HALO Trust Board. On rejoining the army, he has held several appointments including running overseas training exercises outside of Europe and as Military Assistant to the General Officer Commanding in southern Iraq, where he was responsible for Operation Heritage, a project set up with the British Museum and the Iraqi State Board of Antiquities and Heritage to assess the impact of looting at archaeological sites in the south and for the construction, still ongoing, of a museum in Saddam Hussein’s palace in Basra. Latterly, he commanded a Company Group in Helmand, Afghanistan and orchestrated Lessons Capture for training across the army and for military involvement in the Olympic Games. He has recently left the army and is now working on a project for the Curzon Institute to develop the understanding of the significant Commonwealth contribution during the First World War.

 

Sue Cole

Independent Consultant and ICOMOS UK Representative

 

Ms Margaret Crockett

Ms Margaret CrockettMargaret Crockett is an archives and records management consultant. She represents the International Council on Archives, one of the founding members of the Blue Shield International, on the UK Board. Margaret has expertise in vital record protection, emergency planning and disaster recovery for archives, both on a practical level and as a trainer. She has lived and worked in the US, Hungary, Bosnia and Germany as well as delivering training and doing projects for organisations all over the world. Margaret has held the office of Deputy Secretary General at ICA for the last 5 years where her current role is in the delivery of its professional programme. This includes liaison with the Experts Group for Emergency Management and Disaster Preparedness.

David M Lakin

David Lakin

David is a cultural heritage consultant with a background in archaeology. He is a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeology (MCIfA) and is employed by Ove Arup & Partners International, a leading Engineering and Consulting firm based in London. David undertakes assessment and strategy development work providing advice on the archaeological and cultural heritage implications of a range of projects, from urban regeneration and infrastructure to cultural strategies. He has been involved in large-scale infra-structure projects such as HS2.

Prior to taking up his present post with Arup David was a field archaeologist with the Museum of London and AOC Archaeology. David is a member of the CIfA special interest group for archives and helped to develop an archiving strategy for HS2.

David has been an Army Reservist since 1993.

 

Fiona Macalister

Fiona MacalisterA member of ICOM-UK Executive Committee and ICOMOS-ICORP (International Committee for Risk Preparedness). An accredited conservator and Fellow of the International Institute of Conservation, the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, the Royal Society of Arts and the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust. An independent Preventive Conservator who has lectured on disaster planning and training for disasters at international conferences in Turkey, Georgia, Bhutan and Sweden and for the ICCROM ICWCT course, Norway. Member of the former DCMS Emergency Planning Training Group, she delivers training at the West Midlands Fire Academy on the Emergency Salvage Course run under the chairmanship of English Heritage and works with other major heritage organisations across the UK. An archaeological conservator at seasonal sites in the Middle East, 1983 – 2001. Fiona acted as Secretary for UK Blue Shield from its inception until she stepped down in October 2015.

 

Suzanna Pembroke

Suzanna PembrokeSuzanna is a cultural heritage consultant, with a background in anthropology and archaeology.  She is a Member of the Institute for Archaeology (MIfA), a Chartered Geographer and holds an MSc in GIS and Spatial Analysis in Archaeology.  She is employed by Ove Arup & Partners International, a leading Engineering and Consulting firm based in London.  Suzanna undertakes assessment and strategy development work providing advice on the archaeological and cultural heritage implications of a range of projects, from urban regeneration and infrastructure to cultural strategies, and disaster planning and response. She has been involved in various large-scale infra-structure projects including Crossrail, the London Olympic Village, and the Thames Tideway Tunnel.

In 2011 Suzanna worked with an expert team of disaster consultants in Christchurch, NZ, advising on the cultural heritage aspects related to recovery and rebuilding of the city and was subsequently involved in a city reconstruction project for Christchurch.  She has spoken on Woman and Inclusive Masterplanning at an event at the House of Lords, Westminster.   Before moving to the UK, Suzanna was employed as a cultural heritage consultant in Australia.  She was responsible for undertaking site assessments through field survey work, community engagement with Indigenous Traditional Owners, and providing input to rural and urban redevelopments with a focus on cultural heritage values. She is also an Army Reservist, with the Honorable Artillery Company (HAC) based in London.

 

Dr Nigel Pollard

Nigel PollardNigel Pollard is associate professor in the Department of History and Classics at Swansea University. He has worked as a field archaeologist in Syria, Egypt, Tunisia, Italy and the UK over the last 30 years, was a staff member of the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology at the University of Michigan, and has extensive experience of research in museum collections and archives. He has a particular current interest in the history of cultural property protection, especially archaeological sites in the Second World War and the work of the Allied ‘Monuments Men’, the Monuments, Fine Arts and Archives Sub-Commission.

 

 

Julian Radcliffe

Julian Radcliffe, The Art Loss Register.Julian Radcliffe is the Chairman of the International Art and Antique Loss Register Ltd. He graduated with an MA from Oxford in Politics and Economics and joined Hogg Robinson as a Lloyd’s insurance broker in 1970.He started Investment Insurance as the leading political risk broker in 1972 and still acts as an expert on major political risk claims such as Cuba, Indonesia, Russia and South America.He founded Control Risks in 1976 to specialise in international risk management including kidnap negotiations and became a Director of Hogg Group Plc, a leading Lloyd’s broker. He initiated the Art Loss Register in 1990 as an initiative of the Insurance industry and Art trade to reduce the theft of and trade in stolen art and became the majority shareholder in 2004. He is also Chairman of The Equipment Register which undertakes the same task for stolen construction equipment.He has acted as an expert witness in major international fraud, political risk, negligence and art theft court cases. He served as a Colonel in the Ministry of Defence and was awarded the OBE in 1999 and the QVRM in 2004.Recently he has supervised some 50 Art Loss Register recoveries including the return of the Hooke manuscripts for the Royal Society, missing since 1662, the seizure of the pictures stolen from the Bakwin collection, valued at £18m, and many cases for Lloyd’s and other insurers including recently a Klee, Dufy, Alma Tadema and Gerome. He wrote the forward to “Stolen” published by Madison Press Books in 2008 and has contributed articles such as Ethical Issues – The Art Trade and Stolen Art, Under Duress – Art and Extortion, Attitudes to Art Crime – The Romantic versus the Realist. He collects early English Watercolours and Old Master drawings.

 

Dr Eleanor Robson

Eleanor RobsonEleanor Robson is The British Institute for the Study of Iraq’s voluntary Chair of Council and Reader in Ancient Near Eastern History at University College London.

 

 

 

 

Bijan RouhaniDr Bijan Rouhani

Bijan Rouhani is a conservation architect and cultural heritage consultant. His field of interest is reducing risks to heritage sites, especially in times of armed conflict and natural disasters. He is an expert member of ICOMOS International Committee on Risk Preparedness (ICORP), and a member of the UK Blue Shield Committee.

In 2010, he obtained his PhD in Conservation of Architectural Heritage form La Sapienza, the University of Rome, Italy. His research was on International Principles for the Protection of Cultural Heritage during Armed Conflict, and he has carried out case studies in Lebanon and Kosovo. Since the launch of ICCROM’s international courses on First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Conflict, Bijan has been collaborating with ICCROM for teaching in these courses. Since 2011, he is coordinating the activities of ICOMOS’ working group for the protection of Syria’s cultural heritage during the on-going armed conflict in the country. He is the coordinator of ICOMOS-ICCROM e-learning courses for Syrian cultural heritage professionals. He has worked with War Free World Heritage Listed Cities programme, funded by the EU. He has also collaborated with Iranian Cultural Heritage, Handicrafts and Tourism Organization and the Italian Superior Institute for Conservation and Restoration (ISCR).  In 2014 he was elected Vice President of the ICOMOS Scientific Committee on Risk Preparedness (ICORP).

 

Professor Andrew Shortland

Andrew Shortland is Professor of Archaeological Science at Cranfield University. He leads a group of archaeologists and anthropologists who employ their skills in a whole range of historical and/or defence related fields. The group works routinely on the location, recovery and identification of individuals in combination with police, MoD and charitable organisations. It routinely provides scientific support for MoD archaeologists working on MoD land the UK and elsewhere. Professor Shortland’s work concentrates in two areas. The first involves the identification and interpretation of material culture from the ancient and historical worlds. He is particularly involved in the analysis of glass, glaze and ceramics of a wide range of dates from the fourth millennium BC to the nineteenth century AD. Beyond vitreous materials, he is involved in the application of science more widely to questions arising from art history and archaeology and increasingly forensics. Much of his work involves using the latest techniques to answer questions about valuable or historically important objects. Typically these involve queries about provenance, date, identification of past restoration or conservation and even the detection of deliberate fakes and forgeries. Professor Shortland uses a wide variety of different analytical techniques in his work including SEM-EDS, microprobe, XRF, XRD, Raman, LA-ICPMS, PIXE and optical microscopy. Secondly, Professor Shortland is increasingly interested in the fate of archaeological and historical sites, objects and museums in conflict zones. This work involves liaison with the military and the development of research, training and education for armed forces in theatre and at home.

 

Professor Andrew Wilson

Andrew WilsonAndrew Wilson is Professor of the Archaeology of the Roman Empire at the University of Oxford, and a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. His research interests include the economy of the Roman Empire, ancient technology, ancient water supply and usage, Roman North Africa and archaeological field survey. He has served as Chairman of the Society for Libyan Studies, and has excavated and studied ancient water systems in Italy, Tunisia, Libya, Syria, Cyprus and Morocco.

Recent publications include: Quantifying the Roman Economy: Methods and Problems (ed. with Alan Bowman, Oxford, 2009), Settlement, Urbanization and Population (ed. with Alan Bowman, Oxford, 2011); The Roman Agricultural Economy: Organization, Investment, and Production (ed. with Alan Bowman, Oxford, 2013); Alexandria and the North-Western Delta (ed. with Damian Robinson, Oxford, 2010) and Maritime Archaeology and Ancient Trade in the Mediterranean (ed. with Damian Robinson, Oxford 2011); and papers on Saharan trade (Azania 2012) and Capitolia (with Jo Quinn, JRS 2013).

 

Observers to the Board 

Stephen Bashford (Observer)

Hosta ltd, Heritage Management Consultants

 

James Bridge, Helen MacLagan (Observers)

UK National Commission for UNESCO

 

Hannah Bryce (Observer)

Chatham House

 

Peter Clayton (Observer)

Worshipful Company of Arts Scholars, and the Antiquities Dealers Association

 

 

James Hooper (Observer)

Global Heritge Fund, UK

 

Nicola Iles (Observer)

Clarence House

 

John Lewis (Observer)

I am an archaeologist with 30 years experience in the profession. My academic specialisation centres on the late Glacial and Early Mesolithic lithic assemblages of southern Britain together with a detailed knowledge of the Neolithic and Bronze Ages of the Middle Thames. I was the head of Framework Archaeology from 200-2010, a joint venture between Wessex and Oxford Archaeology to provide Cultural Heritage advice to BAA Ltd. In this capacity I led the Cultural Heritage work at Heathrow Terminal 5, the application to build a second runway at Stansted and a third runway at Heathrow. I have been General Secretary of the Society of Antiquaries of London since 2010. In this role I act as the Chief Executive of the country’s premier Learned Society concerned with protecting and researching the material remains of the past of this and other countries.

 

Michael Meyer (Observer)

British Red Cross Michael Meyer OBE is Head of International Law at the British Red Cross.  He has worked for the British National Society for over 30 years, and is a specialist in international humanitarian law as well as in the protective emblems and in principles and laws relevant to the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.  Mr Meyer has served on government and Red Cross/Crescent delegations to international meetings, and represents the British Red Cross on the United Kingdom Inter-departmental Committee on International Humanitarian Law.  He has contributed articles to journals, and edited publications, on various legal and humanitarian matters.

 

Keith Nicholl (Observer)

DCMS

 

Richard Osgood (Observer)

Defence Infrastructure Organisation

 

Lt Col Tim Purbrick (Observer)

British Army

 

David O’Toole (Observer)

Harvey Nash

 

Alexandra Warr and Henry Own-John (Observer)

Historic England

 

Hafed Walda (Observer)

Deputy Ambassador (pending) to the Permanent Libyan Delegation to UNESCO, Kings CollegeLondon